The End of Don't Ask, Don't Tell: The Impact in Studies and Personal Essays by Service Members and Veterans

The End of Don't Ask, Don't Tell: The Impact in Studies and Personal Essays by Service Members and Veterans
Title:
The End of Don't Ask, Don't Tell: The Impact in Studies and Personal Essays by Service Members and Veterans
Format:
Paperback
USA Price: 
$27.00
$6.75
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In stock
GPO Stock Number:
008-000-01063-3
ISBN:
9780160905469
Description

Featuring 4 reports and 25 personal essays from diverse voices-both straight and gay-representing U.S. Marine Corps, Army, Navy, and Air Force veterans and service members, this anthology examines the impact of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" and its repeal on 20 September 2011 in order to benefit policy makers, historians, researchers, and general readers.

Topics include lessons from foreign militaries, serving while openly gay, women at war, returning to duty, marching forward after repeal, and support for the committed same-sex partners and families of gay service members.

Edited by J. Ford Huffman and Tammy S. Schultz.

Who should read this?

  • Members of the U.S. military,
  • policymakers at Department of Defense,
  • Social Sciences and Culture scholars and students,
  • National Security scholars and students,
  • Civil Rights scholars and students,
  • Anthropological scholars and students,
  • and the general public.

This book includes both a report section that will be of interest to policymakers and decision makers within the U.S. military and Department of Defense and academia, but also a section of essays that will be of interest to a wider audience, including the general public.  The editors’ media hits suggest that media interest is wide and diverse.

 

Related products:

Top Health Issues for LGBT Populations: Information and Resource Kit is available here: https://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/017-024-01702-7

 

Table of Contents

Table of Contents:

About the Nomenclature.................................................................................vi

Preface ......................................................................................................................vii

Tammy S. Schultz Acknowledgments ......................................................xiii

Introduction..............................................................................................................xvi

J. Ford Huffman and Tammy S. Schultz

Part One: The Reports ............................................................................................1

After Repeal: Lessons from Foreign Militaries .........................................2

Nora Bensahel- The Case for Military Family Readiness: Support for the Committed Same-

Sex Partners and Families of Gay Service Members ............................18

LtCol Thomas Dolan, USMC, and Cdr Randall J. Biggs, USN - An Analysis of Opinion: The Impact of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” Its Repeal, and the Proposed Plan to Implement the Repeal..............................................48

Maj Darrel L. Choat, USMC -It’s Time to Redefine the Marine Warrior ...................111

Maj Alasdair B. G. Mackay, USMC -Part Two: The Essays ................................................................................................137

Introduction to the Essays...........................................................................138

J. Ford Huffman -   To Think Critically and Creatively, to Dare to Know..........................................141

Col Michael F. Belcher, USMC (Ret.) -- Serving While Openly Gay: Coming Out in 1993 and Serving as a Gay Marine .................................................145

Justin Crockett Elzie -An Openly Gay Navy Officer for Four Years ............................................................148

R. Dirk Selland -Women at War: I Represent the People Whose Voices Aren’t Heard ................................152

Vernice Armour - A High Five Instead of a Kiss................................................................157

Kristen Kavanaugh - In a Combat Zone I Was Worried That I Would Be Found Out............................161

Julianne H. Sohn - Return to Duty: Gay Troops Will Continue to Conduct Themselves with Honor ..........................165

Antonio G. Agnone -I Hope to Resume My Career as an Officer and Leader..........................................169

Michael D. Almy -A Law That Said I Am Not Good Enough to Serve.................................................173

David Hall -Repeal is a Testament to the Core Values of the United States...............................176

Joseph Christopher Rocha -One of My Best Friends: Of 5,936 Floggings, Only 5 for “Homosexual Offenses” .........................................178

Mark D. Faram - Joe’s Story is the One I Tell Most Often ...............................................................183

Seth Moulton - At Ease with Myself: I Allowed Law to Compromise Honor, Courage, Commitment ........................187

Maj Darrel L. Choat, USMC -It Is Possible That Someone in the Room Is Gay......................................191

Maj Dirk Diener, USMC - Coming Out to a Fellow Marine Was No Big Deal ................................................195

Brian Fricke -“Buck Up and Serve Honorably”.................................................................199

Justin H. Johnson -After a First Salute to Two New Officers, Devastation............................................202

Ed Luna -The Moral Dilemma of Honor and Deception.........................................................206

Maj Alasdair B. G. Mackay, USMC -Investigated 17 Times in 23 Years of Service ......................................209

Kristen L. Tobin -A Legacy of the Holocaust, Normandy, and Vietnam.............................................213

Stacy J. Vasquez -Marching Forward: A Time to Empower Gay Troops to Speak for Themselves ....................................217

Lara A. Ballard - The Knife Is Out of Their Backs.................................................................................220

Michelle M. Benecke - Reactions from Indifference to Open Support .........................................................224

SFC David Cogdill, USA - The Law Magnified a Cultural Barrier ......................................................................227

Andrew Harris - Services Will Get On with the Business at Hand .....................................................230

Brendan P. Kearney - Appendix: Historical Documents ...................................................................................235

They Are Already There ..............................................................................................237

Senator Jim Webb -What the Service Chiefs Said: Statements to the Senate .........................................239

From the Commandant and the Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps, 28 January 2011 .............................247

Certification of Readiness to Implement Repeal, 22 July 2011 ..............................249

Contributors ......................................................................................................................251

About the Editors .............................................................................................................254

Audience

Target audience are members of the U.S. military, policymakers at Department of Defense, Social Sciences and Culture scholars and students, National Security scholars and students, Civil Rights scholars and students, Anthropological scholars and students, and the general public.

Reviews

June 2013
Selected Library Journal's 2012 Notable Government Documents

Praise for the printed edition:

The End of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell: The Impact in Studies and Personal Essays by ServiceMembers and Veterans. ed. by J. Ford Huffman & Tammy S. Schultz. Marine Corps Univ. 2012.
This report combines personal testimony of gay marines with formal studies and other documentation to assess the effect of DADT and of its repeal. Contributors include gay and straight officers and enlisted service members, civilians, politicians, academics, and others.
http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/06/publishing/notable-government-documents-of-2012/#_

The Washington Post, Article: “The End of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” edited by J. Ford Huffman and Tammy S. Schultz by Brian Turner
"The book suggests that, surely, if the militaries of Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands and Britain have integrated homosexual service members into their ranks — in some cases going as far back as the early 1970s — we can do the same, without degrading unit cohesion and battlefield effectiveness. The editors also suggest — and rightly so — that the empirical and anecdotal data gathered here constitute a fundamental addition to our knowledge of the changing cultural and psychological climate for our military as it learns to accept openly gay personnel."

For futher reading:

New York Times --Featured Story, January 20, 2013
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/20/us/gay-spouses-face-a-fight-for-acceptance-in-the-military.html?hpw&_r=0

Excerpt on Servicemembers (CQ) Legal Defense Network blog posted March 14, 2012
http://www.sldn.org/blog/archives/a-law-that-said-i-am-not-good-enough-to-serve/

Product Details

Availability Details:
In Stock
USA Price:
$6.75
International Price:
$9.45
Publisher:
Defense Dept., Navy, Marine Corps, Marine Corps University Press
Author:
  • Huffman, J. Ford
Notes:
Although this book does not have a stock number beginning with 008-055, it is a Marine Corps publication.
Key Phrases:
  • End of Dont Ask Dont Telll
  • Gays in the Military
  • Lesbians in the Military
  • Armed Forces
  • Military History
  • Naval History
  • Marine Corps History
Weight:
1.25
Quantity Price:
Discount
Cover:
Paper
Unit of Issue (US):
1
Unit of Issue (Non-US):
1
Record Creation Date:
03/19/2012
Last Status Update:
01/22/2019
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